Change of Plans

My motivation to continue updating this blog and website has fallen dramatically. The plan was to continue to update the site in Spanish and write about crag in the United States. It goes without saying that the motivation to continue practicing Spanish in a written sense is minimal and updating the website with info on USA crags is pretty much pointless because there is such a wealth of information on Mountain Project. That being said it appears that the website is still helpful to many as it still gets a reasonable amount of views and I get emails and comments from time to time from people looking for help. My plans are as follows; keep the website up with all the information for Colombia and continue responding to comments and emails to help people climb in the amazing country that is Colombia. I am headed to New Zealand in Novemeber and there is not that much info on Mountain Project with regard to NZ so maybe I will start updating again when I go there.

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Till then here are some photos from the climbing I have been doing back home in the American West. I have been lucky enough to hit up Joes, City of Rocks, Smith Rock, Tahoe, and all my favorite local crags and hoping to complete the 22pitch 5.11- Squaw Struck in the coming weeks. Till then here are some photos from my adventures back home.

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Purpose Post Colombia

Usually this blog focuses on providing guide information for climbing in the wonderful Country of Colombia but as of 2 weeks ago I am no longer in the country… I have returned home, for the time being. With returning home I struggle with what the purpose of this blog will become. Should I leave it as is? Write about non Colombia related climbing mumbo jumbo? At this point I am not sure but I plan to continue to keep the website running as I have received messages (yes I read what people send me from the ‘contact’ page) and clearly the website has been of use for a handful of people.


Most of the writing here has been purely informational and I have shared little about myself personally. Now that things are shifting it would seem now is an appropriate time to share how I started this project and a bit about what brought me here and my future plans.


A year ago I quit a job I loved as an after school teacher in Salt Lake City Utah (Youth City for anyone who is interested). It was the best job I had ever had. However, it did not provide healthcare so as a 25 year old I was faced with a choice. Hunker down and find a new job that provided healthcare or use the money I had saved to do a trip before I turned 26 and lost my insurance via my parents. The original plan  was travel southern Mexico to Panama in 3 months. The trip ended up being a year long and ended in Colombia. My trip was transformed when I did a hike in Guatemala with the amazing Quetzaltrekkers a trekking and charity operation that funds a school and hogar (if you ever have 3 months of time to volunteer look no further than QT). I could write a book on how amazing Quatzaltrekkers is but ill keep it short. Basically I decided to volunteer as a hiking and climbing guide with them and the minimum was 3 months. My time at Quatzaltrekkers changed my life profoundly, not only did it change my role and purpose in the world but it also opened the door to future travel. I had spent little money in the 3 months that I was volunteering and had met loads of people who advised that I visit Colombia.


After a short bit of traveling in Central America with another ex guide and now close friend I made my way to Colombia. I started by volunteering on a farm building bathrooms and milking cows in order to save money. The farm was close to Suesca, the main rockclimbing area in Colombia. It was there that I realized that the information about rockclimbing in Colombia was fairly limited when it came to information in English. One would think that Suesca was the only place to climb in all of Colombia where in reality there are loads of places to get your rock on. I ended up buying a Motorcycle and doing a bit of a tour of the country climbing when I could and writing about it to keep myself busy.


However, my tourist visa has now expired and I am back in the United States. I would love to work in Colombia as I am CELTA certified and I am currently searching for work that could sponsor a work visa. Until then I plan to do loads of climbing and hiking  in the USA. Which brings me to a new cross roads, I would like to continue writing here but it would seem strange to write about climbing in the USA on a website called Rock Climb Colombia. There is a part of me that is thinking about creating a bit of a guide to climbing in the USA but in Spanish in order to practice my already limited Spanish skills. Anyway, in the coming weeks I will make a decision whether or not to abandon updating this website or start writing it in Spanish. Till then cheers and thanks for reading and thanks to all of you who have given me feedback.

Las Moyas: Boulders Behind Bogotá 

Last weekend I was looking for the easiest way to get to the La Calera boulders in hopes that I could do some pebble wrestling. During my search I encountered some videos of people boulder in a place called Las Moyas located behind Bogota with trail access from Rosales.


Trail map


The hike was steep and maybe not the best approach for people trying to get a quick bouldering session in but from what I could tell there is a much easier approach from the La Calera side. I was excpecting there to be other boulders up there but when I arrived there was nobody. I asked the police if it was ok if I climbed the rocks and used chalk and they said it was all good and enjoyed watching me boulder for an hour or so. 


Despite having seen videos of people climbing in Las Moyas I saw no sign of bouldering routes, chalk or otherwise. Which is strange because with a little bit of work this could be a fun little bouldering spot as the holds are great allowing for countless V0-V3 opportunities. That being said the holds need to be cleaned a bit but with time and work it could be something special. I worked a couple of routes all with sit starts with two of them being reasonably fun. I will upload the boulder problems to MTN Project sooner than later. Until then here are some fotos of the bounding possibilities.


Additionally information about hiking in he area can be found at the Amigos Del Montaña website 

Macheta: It Starts at 11 (video and photos)

I finally snapped. The endless pressure and bubbling anxiety from my CELTA course had reached its peak. It was time to climb. 

My friend Sergio invited me to climb in a small pueblo about two hours out from Bogota and promised big overhangs, guacas (jugs), and hard as hell climbs. He delivered on all three. 


Machete is the Spinal Tap of climbing crags in Colombia. Where Spinal Tap’s amps go to 11 Macheta starts there. There are more than 50 routes in the zone where the lowest grade I saw was a 10c that was as hard as an 11a. In Macheta even the 10’s are 11’s. The rock is steap and overhung and perfect for people who want to warm up on a 12 and project 13’s. AKA not for people like me. That being said if you are a climber looking to push grade this is the place for you. 


At the bottom of the crag is a small hostel where you can get a cheap bed and you might even be fed some delicious sancocho soup after a long hard day. If you have the time to stop by and are a reasonably strong climbing you will have a blast on the rock and with the locals!


I will update the website soon with info on getting there and a list of routes. Till then, choa.

Review: Osprey Farpoint, the best travel bag money can buy

I have spent 10 months with my crimson colored backpackbuddy and the love is as strong as ever. I purchased my Farpoint for my trip from Mexico to Colombia because of its ability to be stored as carry on and because of my experience with other Osprey bags. Little did I know I got far more than what I paid for.

The Bag

The Farpoint is a 40 liter bag which allows you to stow it as carry on most flights. The material is strong, zippers tough and have holes to allow owners to lock pockets with padlocks when you arrive at the hostel or leave the bag at the beach. It’s been 10 months now and I feel that I can carry more than most people do with their 60liter bags. People are always amazed the Farpoint has brought me from Mexico to Colombia. The bag has the best of both worlds as it can be opened like a suitcase making access to cloths and toiletries easy unlike top loaded bags. As you can see from the featured image I was able to fit a harness, 2 pairs of climbing shoes, chacos, pants, puffy, 3 pairs of shorts, jacket, shirts, journal, and other essentials no problems. I can not stress how strong this bag is. It survived countless chicken bus rides, 3 months of use while I was a hiking and climbing guide in Guatemala, endless rain and motorcycle rides in Colombia and even a visit to a glacier. In all this time there are only very small tears in the bag but it has not compromised the integrity yet.


Subtle Beauties

When I see packpakers lugging around 80liter bags filled with garbage they never use I feel grateful that I have such a tiny bag. It forces you to only take the essentials with you (though I have still managed to fit plenty of gifts for friends inside). Like I said, 40liters is more than enough for the typical backpacker. Additionally the bag is small and makes you look less like a tourist trudging through town with a bag on your back bigger than you are and a bag on your front that screams “please rob me”.

Though the shoulder straps can be a bit uncomfortable if you walk with it for multiple day camping trips (which the bag is NOT designed for but I did anyway while guiding) this is the best bag I have ever owned and can’t recommend it enough.

Zipa MTN Project update

The very first area I added to Mountain Project was an area just outside of Bogota called Zipa. At the time I added the location I was unfortunately unable to add the climbs and photos. Recently however, I had a shot at redemption with a return to the wonderfully tranquil and overhanging jug zone that is Zipa. Covered in vegitation that looks like mother natures beard Zipa has no shortage of great climbs. Additionally, I was happy to see that other people (Federico Echevery) have started adding climbs and I am no longer alone in the quest to add routes to this local. If you are looking to do some climbing I highly recommend the area but more than anything I am happy to see that other people are adding climbs making MTN Project of use in Colombia!

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Baños: Rocks and Rafts

Baños is located a short bus ride from Quito and should only take 3 hours. Baños is the perfect place to continue your journey as it is similar to San Gil Colombia in that it is a place for outdoor activities. 
Located along a stunning river Baños is an absolute treat to walk around. After walking around town chances are you will be hungry for some real Ecuadorian grin. I recommend going to the Mercado in the center of the city where you can get a huge lunch for 2.50$ or a fresh squeezed juice for just a buck. Or if you are a little more adventurous try some of the local guinea pig delecacy.


The town is littered with travel agency’s touting EXTREME activities which feels annoying when really they just rent bikes and organize tours that even your mom could get along on. That being said probably the most popular activity in Baños is the rafting. For 25$ (including lunch) this is an absolute steal. The rapids are reasonable but considering you could not get someone to drive you to the mouth of the river in the USA for 25$ this is a no brainer. Not only is it cheap but it is an absolute blast!
Unfortunately I was unable to do any climbing during my time in Baños. However, there is plenty to be had behind the Zoo. If you have equipment just ask for thfor Zoo and you will find some sport routes. Additionally, it is worth it to hike up to Casa De Árbol for a stunning view and a good time swinging!

After a long day rafting, climbing, or hiking it is worth visiting one of the many hot springs in town. The spring located under the main waterfall in town is open at night and has varying temperatures that left me feeling rejuvenated for the following day. 

Climbing Quito: Rocks at 2850m

If you are anything like me you loved Colombia so much you had to renew your visa after thirty days. I chose to cross the boarder with Ecuador and make a bit of a vacation out of it. And fortunately as always there is climbing. I began by taking the bus from Pasto to Quito, the capital of Ecuador.

Quito, the highest capital city on earth has a beautiful colonial side located in the old town and a more bumping nightlife to be found just outside. Located centrally, it is easy to get to the beach, mountains, or Amazon with just one bus!


There is plenty to see and to do in Quito. Visit the many churches and city square and visit the local market to get a full smash meal for just 2.50$. Oh yeah, they use USD in Ecuador which is nice and has an interesting story to it that can be learned by taking the free walking tour that’s leaves from the Community Hostel.
In addition to a cool cultural city Quito has quick access to some fun climbing spots. I met up with a guy from Mountain Project and we headed out to Sigsipamba.

Sigsipamba has a hand full of routes, most of them hard because they are overhung. Not only will you get nice and strong climbing here but it is shielded from the rain which was a god send because during my time in Quito it rained everyday. Sigsipamba is far from the only crag close to Quito but sadly it was the only one I had a chance to visit and I will hopefully adding the routes to MTN Project soon. 

Los Nevados National Park: Palms and Peaks

Los Nevados is a gigantic park located West of Bogota and is accesible from Salento, Manizales, and a few other small towns. It is a park of amazing natural beauty and kind hearted farmers.

 

My journey begins in Salento where I met up with my buddy Kurt who I used to volunteer guide with in Guatemala. Salento is a touristy cozy town located next to the park that boasts plenty of accomodating hostels. While relaxing in Salento make sure to go for a hike to the surrounding rivers, eat some of the deliciously cheap trout (trucha), and kick back with a beer at the main square. While Salento is deserving of a post all its own the true meat of Salento comes from the park Los Nevados.

 

The park is unique in my experience of Colombia because it is one of the few parks where no guide is needed (though they are very helpful). Kurt and I began our day early and left for Cocora Valley (the entrance to the park) from the main square at 8am. Transport was on the back of a jeep and cost about 3,000 COP (1$). There is a standard loop that many tourists do from the hummingbird area to the palm trees. Kurt and I opted for a more intense route.

 


We began by visiting the iconic palm trees first where we then proceeded to cross a few rivers and climb for what seemed like forever to Finca Primavera. It took us 7 hours to arrive at the finca where we were greated with amazing home cooked food and a cozy bed. The next day we explored the incredible vistas and waterfalls and ran into a guide at Finca La Playa who said he could guide us up the Tolima Glaciar.

 

Usually I am not one for guides but this was well worth the money because much of the route we made was done in the middle of the night. We left to scale Tolima at 1am in total darkness and rain. Tolima is the tallest volcano in the park at 5215m (around 17,000ft). After scrambling up light snow and a rock section we reached the Tolima glaciar where we put on our crampons, rope, and ice axes. The rain was clearing and the sun rising. We had an incredible view from the top and even were able to see one of the other volcanos in the park erupting. The weather window was perfect as it started to rain once we began our decent.

 

The downclimb was great because we could finally see the trail we had been hiking the entire time. We even past a point of great interest where we could see the left over tail from a plane that had crashed years ago. We returned to Finca La Playa around noon and took a nap and awoke just in time for dinner.

 

Our original plan was to hike the following day to Termales Cañon, camp, then hike out at Ibague the day after. However, it was raining so hard we decided to head back to salento. If you would like a detailed map for the trail all the way to Ibague I recommend this website. The trail down was absolutely soping wet and was more like skiing than hiking. The river was running so high that we used some folks passing buy on horse to help us get accross. All in all Los Nevados is an incredible park that we only scratched the surface of, as there are many hikes and trails in the area and one can spend weeks exploring these areas. If you would like to see a video of the adventure click here.